With tones ranging from electrifyingly vibrant to subtle and understated, and all with gleamingly gorgeous finishes, how could one not be crazy about a beautiful pot?

When my canary yellow Le Creuset is missing from the stovetop, where it typically lives, the kitchen seems sparse and boring.  My investment pot has become the artwork for our kitchen, which needed some soul.   Like clementines in a rustic wooden bowl or green apples in clear glass set upon a dining table, cookware can also be a “useful” statement piece of a room.  Purposeful artwork.

My tried-and-true.  I may not have valuable artwork to be listed in my will, but there's always my Le Creuset.

My tried-and-true.

My mother recently re-tiled the backsplash of open shelving in her kitchen in glistening white to create a canvas for her extensive collection of timeless cookware.  Some of her pieces date back to the 70’s (wedding gifts to be specific), while others have been more recent indulgences.  All still appear beautiful and well loved and I can attest they have been the vehicle of many insanely delicious meals.   The collection, strategically placed, has created a gorgeous contrast in her kitchen, where her cookbooks used to reside.  A fantastic and rather simple makeover!

Without constituting a sterile or cold setting, I tend to prefer a simplistic and minimal tone in a kitchen.   And so a visible cumulation of pots and pans typically does not appeal to me, aesthetically speaking.   The key is to choose one or two pieces that bring some oomph to the room.  Here are some photos of inspiration for you to work from:

 

Completely timeless and utilitarian.  Always a safe bet.

Black, timeless and utilitarian. Always a safe bet.

Ivory, always a classic.  Although I might cry the first time it got dirty.

Ivory, always a classic. Although I might cry the first time it got dirty.

And the colors just keep on comin'.  So tasteful, the choice becomes difficult!

And the colors just keep on comin’. So tasteful, the choice becomes difficult!

 

Oooh- for all you Northerners keeping toasty with wood heat this winter, try using a beautiful pot or tea kettle as a humidifier on top of your woodstove.